“Understanding Cheap Talk and the Emergence of Trust in Global Software Engineering: An Evolutionary Game Theory Perspective” published at CHASE 2013

The paper “Understanding Cheap Talk and the Emergence of Trust in Global Software Engineering: An Evolutionary Game Theory Perspective” was published and presented at , The 6th International Workshop on Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering (CHASE 2013), held in conjunction with the 35th International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE 2013, San Francisco, California).

 Understanding Cheap Talk and the Emergence of Trust in Global Software EnginAbstract: 

While studying global software engineering teams, we found that informal non-work related conversations are positively associated with trust. We sought to investigate this phenomenon more carefully. To this end, we employed evolutionary game theory. In that literature, the kind of non-work related conversations we observed are referred to as “cheap talk”. We modified the original Stag-hunt game, and have it “play” repeatedly by a fixed population. Doing so, we are able to demonstrate how cheap talk in remote collaborations over the Internet is powerful enough to facilitate the emergence of trust and improve the probability of collaboration. We elaborate on the conditions for success and discuss both theoretical and practical implications of our findings for collaboration.

Keywords:
Cheap talk, trust, Global Software Engineering (GSE), Evolution Game Theory (EGT), Stag-hunt game.

 

 

Full reference:
Wang, Yi, Redmiles, D. Understanding Cheap Talk and the Emergence of Trust in Global Software Engineering: An Evolutionary Game Theory Perspective, The 6th International Workshop on Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering (CHASE 2013), held in conjunction with the 35th International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE 2013, San Francisco, California), May 25, 2013, published in ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, V. 38, N. 5, September 2013, pp. 34-37.

 

Author: Benjamin Koehne

Benjamin Koehne is a Ph.D. Candidate in the department of Informatics at UC Irvine.