May 31, 2015
by admin
Comments Off

Oliver defended His PhD Thesis

CRADL Lab member Oliver Yi Wang has successfully defended his dissertation: Cheap Talk, Trust, and Cooperation in Networked Global Software Engineering: Game Theory Model and Empirical Evidence. Congratulations Oliver!

IMG_1168

 

 

 

 

February 19, 2015
by admin
Comments Off

CRADL research is featured in ISR Connector

 

newsletter-page-001The newly released issue of ISR Connectors (Fall/Winter 2014) highlights the research happens in CRADL lab. This research combines game theory modeling and empirical study to investigated the influences of “cheap talk” (informal, non-work-related conversations, e.g., talking about funny pics.) on trust and cooperation development in global software engineering activities. Using this innovative approach, we can analytically explain and predict the dynamics in both individual and group level.

Instead of traditional conceptualization of cheap talk as an externalization of social relationship, we treat cheap talk as a type of strategic behavior. Doing so enable us to specify individual team member’s behaviors according to her expected payoffs through interacting with other members. Our model indicates “cheap talk” does help the trust and cooperation development, but disappears once trust and cooperation established as the norm within the team.

A short paper discussed the theoretical model published in Chase 2013, we are working on several following papers.

 

 

February 19, 2015
by admin
Comments Off

Two papers published in Information & Software Technology

Two papers published in the journal Information & Software Technology. The first paper: “Facilitating contagion trust through tools in global systems engineering teams” [1] discusses the role of various social and technical tools (software tools, office technologies, or organizational structures, etc.) in initiating the development of trust. This paper is coauthored by Dr. Al-Ani and Prof. Redimiles with collaborators (Dr. Marczak and  Prof. Prikladnicki) in PUCRS.

Using systematic review method, the second paper: “A systematic literature review on the barriers faced by newcomers to open source software projects” [2] identifies and classifies the barriers that newcomers face when contributing to open source software projects. This paper also summarized the limitation of existing empirical studies of barriers faced by newcomers and identified the new research opportunities. This paper is coauthored by Prof. Redmiles with several colleagues in Brazil.

paper 1-page-001 (1)paper 2-page-001

Citations.

[1] Al-Ani, B., Marczak, S., Redmiles, D., Prikladnicki, R. Facilitating Contagion Trust through Tools in Global Systems Engineering Teams. Information and Software Technology, Vol 56, no. 3, pp. 309-320, 2014.

[2] Steinmacher, I., Silva, M.A.G.,  Gerosa, M. A. ; Redmiles, D. A systematic literature review on the barriers faced by newcomers to open source software projects. Information and Software Technology, Vol. 59, pp.67-85, 2015

February 18, 2015
by admin
Comments Off

Our paper on extracting insights from cloud based IDEs received Innovation and Potential Impact Award in ICSE 2014

paper-page-001Our paper: “New opportunities for extracting insights from cloud based IDEs” was presented in the New Idea and Emerging Results track (NIER) of ICSE 2014 held in Hyderabad, India. This paper demonstrates the opportunity offered by cloud based IDEs (e.g., Cloud9) in identifying developer’s expertise, personal characteristics, and behaviors. This paper is coauthored by CRADL PhD student Yi Wang and Prof. Redmiles with our collaborators (Dr. Patrick Wagstrom and Dr. Evelyn Deusterwald) in IBM Research.

The paper is one of the two recipents of the “Innovation and Potential Impact Award” of NIER track.

Citation:

Wang, Y., Wagstrom, P., Duesterwald, E., & Redmiles, D. (2014, May). New opportunities for extracting insights from cloud based IDEs. In Companion Proceedings of the 36th International Conference on Software Engineering (pp. 408-411). ACM.

February 18, 2015
by admin
Comments Off

Benjamin Koehne defended PhD Thesis

CRADL Lab member Benjamin Koehne has successfully defended his dissertation: Collaboration strategies employed in a virtual world while performing distributed usability inspections. Congratulations Ben!

Ben is working in Google New York as an User Experiences Researcher.

10610697_4477987045469_8036137760586571520_n

Abstract.

Geographically distributed collaboration has become the common way to work in many industries. Collaborative tools for supporting distributed work in complex work environments rely on information and communication technology to enable meaningful, rich interactions in the distributed team. Virtual world technology has advanced rapidly in recent years and public virtual worlds draw millions of users. Innovative, natural user interfaces have become more broadly available at lower costs, opening up virtual world technologies to a broader range of applications. The lower barrier to entry creates opportunities in CSCW to apply virtual world technology in collaborative tools for distributed teams. Yet, there are only few systems built specifically for collaborative activities using virtual world technology and our understanding of how users collaborate in virtual world environments is still very limited. In this dissertation I sought to discuss the implementation and evaluation of INspect-World, a collaborative tool for conducting and managing distributed usability inspections. In two empirical qualitative studies I observed, analyzed, and documented collaborative behaviors and strategies performed in the INspect-World virtual world environment. I found that users developed unique collaborative strategies in the contexts of team building, interacting on a level playing field, using virtual scaffolding mechanisms, and working with rules in the open virtual space. The qualitative findings represent an important stepping stone between the past and the future of applying virtual world technology in collaborative tools for geographically distributed work.

February 18, 2015
by admin
Comments Off

CRADL hosted SCALE meeting in Irvine

IMG_4684

CRADL lab hosted the SCALE Bi-annual Meeting in Irvine. Faculties and graduate students from the three participating universities (CMU, UCI, and UNL) enjoyed the sunshine of Southern California. Prof. Brian Skyrms (UCI) and Prof. Jim Herbsleb (CMU) delivered two keynote speeches, we also had very productive poster and discussion sessions.

Lots of great discussion happened here!

 

 

January 29, 2014
by Benjamin Koehne
Comments Off

Benjamin Koehne defends PhD Topic: Documenting Collaboration Strategies Employed in Team Learning in the Context of Virtual Worlds

CRADL Lab member Benjamin Koehne has successfully defended the topic of his PhD dissertation in the Informatics program.

Documenting Collaboration Strategies Employed in Team Learning in the Context of Virtual Worlds

Abstract

We propose to carefully document collaboration strategies employed in the context of a specifically designed virtual world environment that supports distributed usability evaluations. The system called INspect‐World has been successfully employed for teaching the cognitive walkthrough usability inspection method in an undergraduate HCI class with 79 student participants. An initial analysis of 36 hours of screen recording reveals interesting team learning and collaboration behaviors at different stages of the usability inspection session. We see our findings encompassed in the dimensions of collaboration technology, human‐centeredness, and learning in particular. This paper describes the twofold motivation behind the project. Our ambition is to provide design insights in the form of carefully documented collaboration strategies for novel teaching tools in software engineering education. We also aim to support the development of virtual world based tools for distributed software engineering processes in the industry sector.

January 29, 2014
by Benjamin Koehne
Comments Off

Oliver Yi Wang Advances to PhD Candidacy: The Nature of Research into Collaboration in Globally Distributed Teams: An Interdisciplinary Review

CRADL Lab member Oliver Yi Wang has successfully advanced to PhD Candidacy in the Informatics program. Congratulations, Oliver!

The Nature of Research into Collaboration in Globally Distributed Teams: An Interdisciplinary Review

Abstract:

This survey aims to characterize the interdisciplinary study of human collaboration in globally distributed teams. Literature on this topic spans many research areas including computer-supported cooperative work, economics, management, organizational behavior, and software engineering, among others. The key contribution of this review is to set forth a well-founded, unified taxonomy that categorizes the literature from different research domains. The taxonomy has two dimensions: primary research goals and ways of knowing. We scanned 17,302 recent published papers (since 01/2005-06/2013) in leading journals from 10 areas, and identified 199 of them to be related to globally distributed collaboration. We then applied our taxonomy to classify these 199 papers. In classifying the existing literature, we identified the opportunities and challenges for furthering the knowledge and application of research in globally distributed teams. Stemming from the review, one of our proposals is to apply Evolutionary Game Theory (EGT) to modeling human collaboration in globally distributed teams and we demonstrate ways of applying EGT with specific examples. Three specific research directions are proposed. In addition to classifying journal papers, we also classified 74 relevant papers (out of 859 reviewed) since 2010 in leading conferences since conference papers are generally considered as formal publication in computer and information sciences. This supplement is presented as an appendix.

November 5, 2013
by Benjamin Koehne
Comments Off

“Revisiting the Factors that Engender Trust of Global Systems Engineers” published at ICGSE 2013

The paper “Revisiting the Factors that Engender Trust of Global Systems Engineers” was published and presented at the 8th IEEE International Conference on Global Software Engineering (ICGSE 2013, Bari, Italy).

Revisiting the Factors that Engender Trust of Global  Systems EngineersAbstract: 

Trust is generally considered a key element of effective and productive distributed team collaborations. In this paper, we report the results of our investigation into the factors that engender trust in Global Systems Engineering (GSE) teams in five multinational organizations. We extend our previous work by conducting a new field study focused solely on factors that engender trust and identify the implications of these factors. Our work provides significant contributions to practitioners, researchers and tool developers. Managers working in study field sites have confirmed that our findings will be used to inform future team management strategies. Our results can also be used to structure and guide future research in this field, as it identifies gaps in existing literature. Finally, our findings can be used to inform the development of future tools that aim to support collaborative work in general and GSE teams specifically.

Keywords:

Distributed teams; global systems development, global systems engineering, virtual teams.

 

 

Full reference:
Al-Ani, B., Marczak, S., Prikladnicki, R., Redmiles, D. Revisiting the Factors that Engender Trust of Global Systems Engineers, The 8th IEEE International Conference on Global Software Engineering (ICGSE 2013, Bari, Italy), August 2013, pp. 31-40.

 

November 5, 2013
by Benjamin Koehne
Comments Off

“Identity Design in Virtual Worlds” published at IS-EUD 2013

The paper “Identity Design in Virtual Worlds” was published and presented at the 4th International Symposium on End-User Development (IS-EUD 2013, Copenhagen, Denmark).

Identity Design in Virtual Worlds  Abstract: 

Designers in HCI and end user development require a good understanding of actors in virtual interaction spaces. Persistent virtual worlds  represent a rather new but growing class of complex design and interaction platforms. Online identities form the basis for interaction of individuals in virtual environments. We present results from an ethnographic study of a  popular online game, and develop a socio-technical model of identity formation that illuminates the processes of identity design in online environments. This framework demonstrates how virtual worlds provide social and technological structures that shape self-presentation and interaction. This allows us to explore the relationship between the real-world identity of the game player and the virtual-world identity of their avatar.

Keywords:

Virtual worlds, design theory, end user design, user-centered design, identity

 

 

Full reference:
Koehne, B., Redmiles, D. Identity Design in Virtual Worlds, The 4th International Symposium on End-User Development (IS-EUD 2013, Copenhagen, Denmark), Springer Lecture Notes in Computer Science, V. 7897, June 2013, pp. 56-71.